All posts by MWV Chamber

Cyber Liability Insurance

Part of the series provided by Chalmers Insurance Group

As technology becomes increasingly important for successful business operations, the value of a strong cyber liability insurance policy will only continue to grow. The continued rise in the amount of information stored and transferred electronically has resulted in a remarkable increase in the potential exposures facing businesses. In an age where a stolen laptop or hacked account can instantly compromise the personal data of thousands of customers, or an ill-advised post on a social media site can be read by hundreds in a matter of minutes, protecting yourself from cyber liability is just as important as some of the more traditional exposures businesses account for in their general commercial liability policies.

Why Cyber Liability Insurance?

A traditional business liability policy is extremely unlikely to protect against most cyber exposures. Standard commercial policies are written to insure against injury or physical loss and will do little, if anything, to shield you from electronic damages and the associated costs they may incur. Exposures are vast, ranging from the content you put on your website to stored customer data. Awareness of the potential cyber liabilities your company faces is essential to managing risk through proper coverage.

Possible exposures covered by a typical cyber liability policy may include the following:

  • Data breaches: Increased government regulations have placed more responsibility on companies to protect clients’ personal information. In the event of a breach, notification of the affected parties is now required by law. This will add to costs that will also include security fixes, identity theft protection for the affected and protection from possible legal action. While companies operating online are at a heightened risk, even companies that don’t transmit personal data over the internet, but still store it in electronic form, could be susceptible to breaches through data lost to unauthorized employee access or hardware theft.
  • Intellectual property rights: Your company’s online presence, whether it be through a corporate website, blogs or social media, opens you up to some of the same exposures faced by publishers. This can include libel, copyright or trademark infringement and defamation, among other things.
  • Damages to a third-party system: If an email sent from your server has a virus that crashes the system of a customer, or the software your company distributes fails, resulting in a loss for a third party, you could be held liable for the damages.
  • System failure: A natural disaster, malicious activity or fire could all cause physical damages that could result in data or code loss. While the physical damages to your system hardware would be covered under your existing business liability policy, data or code loss due to the incident would not be.
  • Cyber extortion: Hackers can hijack websites, networks and stored data, denying access to you or your customers. They often demand money to restore your systems to working order. This can cause a temporary loss of revenue plus generate costs associated with paying the hacker’s demands or rebuilding if damage is done.
  • Business interruption: If your primary business operations require the use of computer systems, a disaster that cripples your ability to transmit data could cause you, or a third party that depends on your services, to lose potential revenue. From a server failure to a data breach, such an incident can affect your day-to-day operations. Time and resources that normally would have gone elsewhere will need to be directed towards the problem, which could result in further losses. This is especially important as denial of service attacks by hackers have been on the rise. Such attacks block access to certain websites by either rerouting traffic to a different site or overloading an organizations server.

Cyber liability insurance is specifically designed to address the risks that come with using modern technology; risks that other types of business liability coverage simply won’t. The level of coverage your business needs is based on your individual operations and can vary depending on your range of exposure. It is important to work with an agent who can identify your areas of risk so a policy can be tailored to fit your unique situation.

As reliance on technology continues to increase, new exposures continue to emerge. As your business grows, make sure your cyber liability coverage grows with it. Chalmers Insurance Group is here to help you analyze your needs and make the right coverage decisions to protect your operations from unnecessary risk 800-360-3000.

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Great Day at Great Glen Trails

By Kathy Bennett

One of the best things about skiing in Mt. Washington Valley is the sheer number of options you have within a very reasonable driving distance. A snowy November continues here so there were several choices for alpine and Nordic skiing options this weekend. I was undecided on my direction when I left my house Saturday morning, so I tossed both downhill and cross country gear in the trunk and decided to wait for inspiration to guide my car.

The inspiration came at the intersection of Route 302 and 16 by Dairy Queen. A bright new billboard beckoned me to Great Glen, home to the new Glen House hotel. It had been about 2 years since I skied there last so it was time for a return visit.

Great Glen TrailsAmazing views great skiers from the base lodge

Driving past Wildcat, which has been open for weeks and looked to be in fine form, I felt a twinge of regret for not choosing downhill. But too much turkey and stuffing made the cardio blast of XC the right choice for me.

Great Glen Trails
Mt. Adams looms large

Any regret quickly dissipated as I arrived. The day was crystal clear and Mount Washington and Mount Adams gave a silent white welcome to those arriving to ski. I was in good company, as a large holiday craft fair was going on, and a competition of some sort brought many young folks to the Notch. All in all, it didn’t feel like November, either by snow conditions, head count or energy level.

I changed out my gear in the convenient and well appointed locker room – changing rooms, bath rooms and space to change made it comfortable to get ready for the day. I asked what was open and groomed and was delighted to hear the answer … “Everything.” How often can you expect this in November?

Inside the Great Angel Cabin

I headed out under the bridge and around the new Glen House. Its huge wall of windows point to the Presidential Range. I made a mental note to return to try out their restaurant, which is gaining a great reputation for both its views and its cuisine.  I skied several loops, across fields, uphill and down, until I came to the Great Angel Cabin. A picnic table outside and Adirondack chairs inside beckon to weary skiers. I stripped off my jacket and relaxed for a bit – the ski uphill definitely got my heart rate up!  After my break, I enjoyed the long turny downhill back towards the lodge, across fields, streams and another view of that lovely new hotel.

Thanksgiving Weekend was a skiers’ dream. What areas were not open are planning on doing so in the next few weeks. Given the natural snowfall, cold temperatures, and the arrival of another foot of snow Tuesday, they should have no problem doing so.

 

 

Thanksgiving Can Wait

By Kathy Bennett

The weekend before Thanksgiving is the time many spend to look up recipes, make shopping lists and gather the goods necessary for the turkey day to come. But snow came early this year to Mt. Washington Valley, so all the Thanksgiving duties got pushed aside as I spent both weekend days checking out the amazing early season skiing in and around North Conway, New Hampshire.

Bretton Woods opened for the season on Friday, Nov. 16 and conditions sweetened up overnight as light snowfall continued. The first thing visitors will notice is the new Gondola base being installed right in front of the base lodge. When complete, it will be the only 8 person gondola in the state.

The gondola base – coming soon with 8 person cabins.

With 7 trails open with 2 lifts operating, Bretton Woods had top to bottom runs ready for action. Skiing in mid-November usually consists of “the white ribbon of death” – a narrow swath of man-made snow down the center of the trail with no white stuff in the trees. Not so this year.  Snowy views greeted skiers as one looked off to Mount Washington and closer, Mount Deception. An all natural snow trail – Granny’s Grit – offered a foot of ungroomed freshies which challenged my first-day-of-the-season legs. Watch out for the water bars and point your tips downhill!

Fun, friends and snow at Bretton Woods on November 17.

I had prepared for the ski season by purchasing new boots at the annual Eastern Slope Ski Club ski swap the previous weekend, and followed up by having custom footbeds installed at the Ski Liquidators. What a difference. Do yourself a favor this ski season – invest in this personalized fitting and watch your skiing improve. I know I did.

Day two of the season saw me searching the basement for my skinny skis and cross country ski boots. With man-made snowmaking, pre-Thanksgiving alpine skiing is not unusual. But cross-country skiing? Now that’s a rare treat. Mt Washington Valley now has three cross-country skiing areas open – Great Glen, Bretton Woods and Jackson Ski Touring. Jackson’s Prospect Farm parking lot was completely full when I arrived at 10:30am on Sunday, so I was not alone in reveling in the early season splendor.  My legs burned, but I made it up to the Orchard Trail, then enjoyed the long downhill before banging a hard right onto Quail. Remind me to work on cardio strength before my next day out. I made it back to my car out of breath and excited to have traveled 3 miles under my own ski power.

Jackson Ski Touring’s Wildcat Valley Trail with tracked and skate grooming November 17

While I didn’t ski it personally, Cranmore reported their November 17th opening to be the earliest in their history. Hannes Schneider would be proud.

Thanksgiving week is predicted to be cold, a treat for snowmakers and skiers alike. Look for more areas to open with more terrain for the long holiday weekend.  

I’m glad I skipped the Thanksgiving prep this weekend – I just hope I remember to pick up the turkey on Wednesday.

All About Automobile Policy Coverage

Part of the series provided by Chalmers Insurance Group

An automobile insurance policy is designed to provide you with a level of protection against property, liability and medical costs if you are involved in a wreck:

  • Property coverage pays for damage to or theft of your car.
  • Liability coverage pays for your legal responsibility to others for bodily injury or property damage. Most other states require car owners to purchase a minimum of bodily injury and property damage liability insurance.
  • Medical coverage pays for the cost of treating injuries, rehabilitation and sometimes lost wages and funeral expenses.

Comprehensive and Collision Coverage

Collision: Covers damage to your car when your car hits, or is hit by, another vehicle or other object. This coverage is not required by a state, but if you have a loan or a lease, then the lien holder will require it.

Comprehensive: Covers your vehicle, and sometimes other vehicles you may be driving, for losses resulting from incidents other than collision. This coverage is not required, but a lender may insist that you carry it until your loan is paid off.

Types of Liability Coverage

Bodily injury liability (BI): This covers injuries that you, the designated driver or policyholder cause to someone else. It does NOT cover the cost of damage to your vehicle, or to you or other people on your policy. It is mandatory in most states.

Property damage liability (PD): Covers you or someone driving the car with your permission if the car damages someone else’s property. It also provides you with legal defense if another party files a lawsuit against you.

Medical payments (MP) or personal injury protection (PIP): This no-fault coverage provides medical expenses to you and your passengers injured in an accident.

Uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage (UM or UIM):  This coverage will reimburse you if of you are hit by an uninsured or hit-and-run driver or when an at-fault driver has insufficient insurance to pay for your total loss.

Top Ways to Save on Your Auto Premium:

  • Consider raising your deductible.
  • Keep up your good driving record.
  • Drive a car with safety features such as anti-lock brakes and airbags.
  • Install an anti-theft device.
  • Ask about our multi-policy discounts.

We’re Here to Help

Did you know that you need specific coverage when vehicles are used for business use? Or that ride-share and taxi services are usually excluded under personal insurance? Call Chalmers Insurance Group today at 800-360-3000 to learn more about all of our automobile insurance and risk management solutions.

Shirley and Richard Van Dyne are White Mountains Treasures

Shirley and Richard Van Dyne are described as mainstays of Memorial Hospital’s entrance for 10 years – and that’s just the beginning. The list of Shirley & Richard Van Dyne’s combined service is extensive, and includes (but is probably not limited to) helping with Tin Mountain Conservation Center, North Conway Community Center, MWV Mud Bowl, Volvo Tennis Tournament, RSVP of Carroll County, The Salvation Army, Boy Scouts of America, John Fuller School reading programs, Madison Elementary School, the Albany Historical Society, Girl Scouts of America, Meals on Wheels, blood drives with the American Red Cross, the Albany Civic Group, and Memorial Hospital.

Shirley and Richard Van Dyne, center, receive the White Mountains Treasure Award from Lee Myles, Interim CEO, Memorial Hospital and Kathy Bennett, VP Community Relations.

The Van Dyne’s have logged in over 2500 hours of service to Memorial Hospital alone over these last ten years, and their service to the community through the aforementioned organizations spans more than 50 years.

Floyd Corson is a White Mountains Treasure

Floyd Corson can be found every Sunday playing the organ at the First Church of Christ. He began his volunteering experience by stepping in to cover the organ for a single Christmas season, and instead remained the volunteer organist for the last 19 years. As an accomplished organist and pianist, Floyd has brought outstanding musical performances for anyone present at church on Sundays.

In addition to his Sunday services, Floyd was the pioneer of the White Mountain Musical Arts and the Bach Festival, which celebrated its 30th year this past summer. Floyd is highly regarded amongst his peers and the main reason the Mt. Washington Valley has been fortunate enough to host so many talented musicians of his field for such little money is a result of their respect for him.

Floyd Corson, center, receives the White Mountains Treasure Award from Lee Myles, Interim CEO, Memorial Hospital and Kathy Bennett, VP Community Relations.

He’s also an accomplished hiker, who’s summited all of New Hampshire’s 4000 footers, and this passion has moved him to volunteer at the Mount Washington Observatory.

For more information on the Chamber’s Annual Meeting!

Conway Area Humane Society opens Re-Tails Resale Shop

The Conway Area Humane Society (CAHS) recently held a ribbon cutting to celebrate the opening of their new ReTails Resale Shop located at the far end of the Conway Area Humane Society Shelter building in Conway. The shop is open Monday – Saturday with many items for sale including furniture, clothing, sporting goods, bedding, collectibles and more!

Volunteer opportunities are available. For more information email Katy at kbailey@conwayshelter.org or visit conwayshelter.org.

Pictured from left Valerie Horn, Board Director, Payton Cressey, Board Director, Katy Bailey, Volunteer Manager, Virginia Moore, Executive Director, Nate Marles, Board Chair, Cheryl Mitchell, Volunteer, and Suzie Laskin, Board Director.

For more information visit Conway Area Humane Society.

2018 Employer of the Year – Badger Realty

The Employer of the Year Award is given each year to a business that demonstrates respect for employees and other business partners and excellence in creating a safe and inviting workplace. The Employer of the Year is also a business offering solid pay/benefits and the opportunity for training and advancement.

This year the Employer of the Year Award goes to Badger Realty. Since 1965, Badger Realty has been a staple of the Mount Washington Valley and a leader of community projects, volunteerism, and advancement. Dick Badger & Brenda Leavitt have created a family-oriented culture within an industry that had not historically been recognized through teamwork. They believe in the power of continuing education and encourage their employees to continue their professional development through education and training whenever possible.

Dick Badger is pictured with Janice Crawford, Executive Director, MWV Chamber of Commerce

Since 1995, Badger Realty has hosted an annual holiday party that included travel, lodging and meals for their employees and significant others. These annual trips have rewarded and brought happy employees (and spouses) to such destinations as Bermuda (5 times), Aruba, Captiva, the Bahamas, Walt Disney World, and Quebec.

A sign of a healthy company is their dedication to the community, which is why local non-profit organizations are crowded with Badger Realty’s agents and support staff. Some of the organizations served by Badger employees include Jen’s Friends, End 68 Hours of Hunger, Habitat for Humanity, Starting Point, Arts Jubilee, the Miranda Leavitt Diabetes Fund and the Mt. Washington Valley Trails Association.

Since longevity is an indication of a positive workplace, it’s notable that 18 employees with 10 or more years of service at Badger Realty, and eleven of those have more than 20 years.

2018 Entrepreneur of the Year – Coldwell Banker Wright Realty

Entrepreneur of the Year is awarded each year to a business in existence for seven or more years which fills a need within the community and demonstrates creativity, innovation and community involvement. Additionally, the business must be people-and-principle oriented as well as profitable.

This year the Entrepreneur of the Year Award goes to the team at Coldwell Banker Wright Realty. Owners Antonella Bliss, Lindsey Maihos and Rose Robinson took over leadership at Coldwell Banker Wright Realty during the same year as the economic crisis, and though the company has experienced ups and downs, 11 years later it has more than doubled its sales volume. In addition, they now have 19 agents and 4 support staff with future plans to expand their office space in Conway.

Lindsey Maihos, Antonella Bliss, and Rose Robinson, Owners, Coldwell Banker Wright Realty.The company has been recognized as the Premier Bronze Office by Coldwell Banker.

Their commitment toward the industry pushed them to host a real estate course in Conway. In the past young professionals interested in a real estate career had to travel outside the area to take the course and obtain a real estate license. Now, they can do that right here in the Valley. This program was instrumental in helping THRIVE recipient Theo Charles successfully become a licensed REALTOR®.

As a business team, they give back to the community through time and donations, encouraging others within the company to also give back to the community.

Business Owners Policy Business Insurance

Part of the series provided by Chalmers Insurance Group
The Importance of Insurance and How it Can Protect Your Finances

Business owners have a lot to consider when choosing insurance that fully protects their business. One coverage option, a business owners policy (BOP), can take the guesswork out of the process. A BOP bundles several types of coverage in one package, similar to the way a homeowners policy works, but is designed for small and midsized businesses.

BOP Key Features

A BOP generally combines the following types of coverage in one convenient bundle:

  • Commercial property insurance—Covers losses to property from common perils. It also covers office equipment, furniture, inventory, machinery, raw materials, computers and anything else that is vital to business operations.
  • General liability insurance—Covers a company’s legal responsibility for any harm it may cause to others, up to the policy limit. It also covers attorney fees and medical bills for anyone injured by the company.
  • Business interruption insurance—Reimburses for loss of income if a covered disaster interferes with the successful operation of the business.

Exclusions

Although a BOP is a convenient insurance option for small to midsized business owners, it does not cover professional liability, auto insurance, or workers’ compensation. Life, health and disability coverage is also excluded. For those exclusions, business owners can purchase separate insurance policies. Other examples include the following:

  • Crime coverage—Although it is minimal, crime coverage can be added to a BOP to cover losses as a result of crime, such as employee dishonesty and computer fraud. Typical crime coverage ranges between $1,000 and $5,000.
  • Data breach coverage—This coverage is commonly added to BOPs to help remedy the following losses resulting from data breaches:
    • Notifying impacted individuals
    • Hiring crisis communication consultants
    • Defense and settlement costs from associated lawsuits
    • Replacement of lost income
    • Extortion and ransom payments

Errors and omissions (E&O) coverage—Businesses that provide services for a fee can be sued by customers who claim that they were harmed because the business failed to perform its job properly. E&O coverage pays for any judgment for which the insured is found legally liable, up to the policy limit. It also covers legal defense costs.

Ideal Candidates for a BOP

Businesses that have the following characteristics are ideal candidates for a BOP:  

  • Operate in a physical location, whether home-based or outside the home
  • Have assets that can be stolen, including products, cash, furniture and digital property
  • Are at a high risk for lawsuits
  • Employ less than 100 employees and have less $5 million in sales

The following types of businesses frequently purchase BOPs to protect from losses not covered by general liability insurance:

  • Manufacturers
  • Religious organizations
  • Apartments
  • Restaurants
  • Technology consultants and solutions providers
  • Wholesalers
  • Retailers

Eligibility

Small to midsized businesses need to meet specific criteria to be eligible for a BOP. When determining eligibility, insurers consider factors that include the type of business, size of its primary location, class of business and revenue.

Premiums for BOP policies are based on eligibility factors, as well as financial stability, building construction, security features and fire hazards.

When purchasing business insurance, it is important to obtain the right amount. Contact Chalmers Insurance Group for guidance as to whether a BOP is a logical choice for your business 800-360-3000.

Protect Against Risks With an Umbrella Policy

Part of the series provided by Chalmers Insurance Group
The Importance of Insurance and How it Can Protect Your Finances

In the event that someone is injured on your property and you are found legally responsible, you could be faced with a costly financial burden. In fact, without a personal umbrella liability insurance policy, any expenses beyond the limits of your standard policy are your responsibility. This applies to your insurance policies including: homeowners, renters, automobile, watercraft and more.

Personal umbrella liability insurance typically provides an extra layer of protection over your personal assets for when your standard liability coverage is exhausted.

Engaging in everyday activities can put you at risk for a lawsuit. Simple things like having a swimming pool or entertaining guests in your home, having a young driver in house, all can increase the chance that someone will get injured and sue you. To minimize your financial risk, consider a personal umbrella liability policy.

Why is a personal umbrella liability policy important?

It works to fill the gaps in your coverage and provides the following benefits:

  • When litigation ensues, it’s typically for a large amount. If you get into a car accident and injure several people, you could be sued for millions of dollars; well beyond the limits of your automobile policy. You can also be held responsible if your dog bites someone, if your child injures another kid in a fight or if a handyman hurts himself at your home.
  • Umbrella policies cover your costly legal fees because the insurance company assumes the risk for you.
  • Coverage is inexpensive and easy to obtain. Just give your Chalmers account manager a call to add it on to your current policy, 800-360-3000.
  • You’ll have peace of mind knowing that you are covered in case of a fluke occurrence.

How much coverage do you need?

Take into consideration your total personal assets and your potential for personal risks when determining how much coverage you need.

A wide range of factors, such as whether you have hired help, if you have teen drivers at home or if you operate your business out of your home, will determine how much coverage is appropriate for your circumstances.

What are the policy limits?

A $1 million limit is typical and higher limits are available.

Contact Chalmers Insurance Group today to determine how much coverage is right for you 800-360-3000.

Lilliputian Montessori School Celebrates New Toddler Program

The Lilliputian Montessori School celebrated the opening of their new toddler program with a ribbon cutting on September 10. The program offers quality child care for children ages 13 months – 35 months with options for two day to 5 day programs as well as before and after care.

Lilliputian also has a preschool and pre k program for children ages 2.5 to 6 years old.

The school curriculum follows the child development research and writings of Dr. Maria Montessori, giving each child the freedom to work and move within limits, which are achieved through order, respect and self-discipline. Through this environment each child develops the skills and self-confidence to allow for a lifetime of creative learning.

“Our nurturing environment provides a gentle bridge from home to school”, said Amber McCay, Executive Director. “Through meaningful hands on activities, children are able to strengthen their language, self-help, motor and social/emotional skills in a prepared environment”.  

The school is located at 65 Seavey Street, North Conway. For information please call 603-356-4464 or visit thelilliputianschool.com.

Pictured from left: Lynn Lyman, Eastern Propane, Andrew Donohoe, former student, Amber McCay, Executive Director, Carrie Burkett, Board President, and Courtney Hamel, Lead Toddler Teacher.

We don’t offer a one day program, we offer a . You can use my name for the quote at the end.