Category Archives: Health in Mt. Washington Valley

Men like to Soak, Sip, and Relax, too, at The Soaking Pot

By Isaac Rader
for the Mt. Washington Valley Chamber of Commerce

Stress relievers come in all forms but a  spa day is one of my favorites. It is always a great way to allow myself an hour of peace and serenity, to just float away from the world and completely relax.

I have been to many spas but they are not often considered male territory. I think that is changing. Men suffer plenty of stress and worse, they can bottle it up, or not see it as being worth revealing. There can be countless little anxieties that they keep hidden as they perseverate on them.

When I first heard of The Soaking Pot I was a bit skeptical. What, I asked, is this? Just foot soaking?

I was surprised. The Soaking Pot was a wonderful experience.

SOAK
Their philosophy is to relax the whole body from the inside out using botanical infusions of the finest salts, herbs, florals and essential oils to relax sore muscles and calm a busy mind,
SIP
Nothing gives you permission to relax like a soothing cup of tea and The Soaking Pot has partnered with some of the finest tea artisans to offer deliciously satisfying teas.
RELAX
To infuse deeper relaxation The Soaking Pot offers a menu of add-on treatments. You can add a head-neck-shoulder massage, lower leg-foot or lower arm-hand to enjoy while you soak.

My visit to The Soaking Pot was heavenly. I chose a calming soak, the Cedarwood Hops. It is meant to alleviate anxiety, insomnia, and an overactive mind. They also offer Invigorating, Balancing, and Soothing Soaks.

It was so relaxing to just sit back and turn off any worries. At first, it may seem silly or even intimidating for a man to open up to something that seems so soft, but that feeling will pass. After all, it’s just taking off your shoes and socks.

For more information visit The Soaking Pot for their menu of services.

39th Annual Memorial Hospital Open Golf Tournament Moves to New Course, Supports New Cause

Now in its 39th year, the Memorial Hospital Open Golf Tournament will be moving to a new course and supporting a new cause, continuing its legacy of raising funds to support North Conway’s community hospital.

This year’s event will be held on Thursday, July 18, 2019 at the North Conway Country Club, located right in the heart of North Conway Village. Golf pro Kevin Walker will welcome golfers to the storied course.  Established in 1895, the North Conway Country Club is known for its views of Mt. Washington and the Presidential and Moat Ranges. The event’s Grazing on the Green dinner and awards will take place in its restaurant, with an exceptional menu golfers have come to expect from this long-running event.

But the location isn’t the only thing changing. This year the tournament proceeds will be directed towards an emerging need at Memorial Hospital, one that impacts many individuals in the community.

Director of Behavioral Health, Lorinda MacDonald, APRN-PMHNP explained the situation.  “Due to the increasing number of behavioral health patients seeking treatment in our Emergency Department (ED), we have an immediate need to expand the number of beds. The ED is always the point of entry for those in crisis seeking psychiatric care. Our mission is to provide the highest level of care for all patients who enter the ED, whether they are in need of medical care or in a psychiatric crisis.”

Due to the lack of available space in psychiatric hospitals, patients in the ED can wait for days or weeks for a bed. This situation also delays care for other community members seeking urgent treatment in the ED. The proceeds of this year’s tournament will be the beginning of a community-based effort to support the needs of this vulnerable population.

Last year the event raised over $52,000 which supported Community Health for a Lifetime, providing funds for childhood wellness and other population health initiatives. The event has raised over $850,000 over its long history, purchasing many pieces of life-saving equipment and supporting community health programs.

Golfers from presenting sponsor The Coleman Companies enjoying the day at the 2018 Memorial Hospital Open Golf Tournament.

The tournament has already secured its Presenting Sponsor, with The Coleman Companies once again taking the top spot. Other sponsorship opportunities are available for local businesses and individuals. Many sponsorship packages also include golf teams for the event. For those wishing to play in the tournament, golfers may join the event as individuals or in teams of four.

The tournament offers one exclusive afternoon flight with play limited to 128 players. Sponsors and golfers are encouraged to sign up early as the tournament sold out last year and is expected to do so again in 2019.

This year’s Golf Tournament Committee members include: Bayard Kennett, Kathy Bennett, Gail Paine, Peter Waugh, Rachael Brown, Corrine Ray, Kathy Sanderson, James Love, Melody Nester, Ed Harrigan, and Mary Vigeant, APRN.

The Memorial Hospital Open Golf Tournament was founded in 1980 by former US Congressman Bill Zeliff and Jackson businessman Lee Harmon.  The tournament is known for its famous Grazing on the Green food extravaganza the evening of the event.

For more information, or to sign up for golf or sponsorship, visit the golf event page online at www.memorialhospitalnh.org/golf  or call Melody Nester at 603-356-5461 ext. 2264 for more information.

Memorial Hospital Supports Ski Helmet Safety for Local Children

Memorial Hospital once again has ensured that every child in its community that wants a ski helmet, gets one, regardless of their family’s ability to pay. It’s all part of a helmet safety initiative to ensure that local school children have appropriate helmets for their participation in elementary ski programs including the Eastern Slope Ski Club’s (ESSC) Junior Ski Program in the Conway School District and, new this year, the Fryeburg Junior Ski Program.

Memorial Hospital Foundation created the Roger C. Clapp Memorial Ski Helmet Fund to help put “a lid on every kid.” Clapp, who passed away in 2013, was a hospital trustee for many years and a passionate lifelong skier. Family and friends make memorial donations to the fund and continue to encourage contributions to it. Special thanks this year go to former hospital trustee Phil Davies, who served alongside Roger Clapp for many years and this year made a generous gift to ensure that the program continue again this year. Additional contributors to the program include many employees who give through a special employee giving program.

The National Ski Areas Association reports on their website that while skiing or boarding responsibly is the first priority for safety, helmets are an important second line of defense. The group reports that wearing helmets can decrease the risk of head injury by 10 to 50 percent. It can also mean the difference between a major head injury and a minor head injury, or between a minor head injury and no injury at all.

Conway Elementary School students Mattie Macomber, Cami Newton and Jillian Howland pose at Cranmore Mountain with Jessica Stewart, Athletic Trainer at Orthopedics at Memorial Hospital. The students are wearing helmets received through the Roger C. Clapp Ski Helmet Program.

“Memorial Hospital provides many healthcare services to help injured skiers and snowboarders, from fixing broken bones to physical therapy, athletic training and concussion care, but our preference is to help skiers and riders to prevent injuries in the first place,” said Jessica Stewart, Athletic Trainer at Orthopedics at Memorial Hospital. “We are lucky that we have the Roger C. Clapp Helmet program to help local children prevent head injuries.”

Many families face difficult financial situations at home which can make it hard for them to find the funds for equipment. As families may struggle to pay for basic necessities, things like skiing equipment may not be a part of their budget. That’s what makes this program so important for students who may not be able to afford it on their own.

This year, over 200 helmets were distributed to students in December, prior to the start of the youth ski program season. To qualify for a free helmet, students must be enrolled in the school’s free/reduced rate meals program while others have the opportunity to purchase helmets at a significant discount.

Anyone wishing to donate to the Roger Ski Clapp Helmet Fund may find more information at www.memorialhospitalnh.org/ways-to-give/make-a-donation or call 603-356-5461, x2269.

Ribbon Cutting for Groups

Groups, a mission-driven medical practice that offers affordable treatment for opioid use disorder in rural communities, celebrated the opening of their ninth New Hampshire location with a ribbon cutting September 4.

Pictured from left; Heather Prebish, Clinical Director, Jennifer Leiser, Office Coordinator, Melissa Fernald, Counselor, Lori Boisvert, Office Coordinator and Trainer, and Evan Stuart, Regional Manager

“We provide effective and affordable treatment to recover from opiate use” said Heather Prebish, Clinical Director. “At Groups, you can get the therapy and medication you need to regain control of your life. Unlike programs where you meet alone with a physician, we bring everyone together. People at different stages of recovery learn from each other, build collective wisdom, and hold each other accountable. Our counselors help you make a deep personal transformation and find purpose in life”.

Groups is located at 1620 East Main Street, Center Conway. For information please call 1-800-683-8313 or visit joingroups.com.

Certified Nurse Midwife Kathleen Mulkern Reaches 1,000 Birth Milestone at Memorial Hospital

The Town of Jackson recorded 816 residents in the 2010 census, but Certified Nurse Midwife Kathleen Mulkern can beat that and then some … she recently surpassed her 1,000th baby delivery at Memorial Hospital. Mulkern has delivered virtually an entire village over her 15 years of service!

Photo Caption: Kathleen Mulkern, ARPN, CNM – Certified Nurse Midwife, shown here with one of the 1,000 babies she has delivered at Memorial Hospital. Mom Tiara Hale is not pictured.
Photo by Megan Bailey

Mulkern has been caring for women and their babies for almost 30 years.  She shared, “I was born and raised in the Mount Washington Valley, and was fortunate to be given the opportunity in 2003 of returning with my family to live, raise my children and work as a nurse-midwife.”

She originally wanted to be a nurse practitioner, but changed her mind when a nurse midwife gave a presentation in college. “And that was it.”

When asked what keeps her going, Mulkern states that it’s the appreciation of people, and how you touch their lives. “There are certain births you always remember. It’s the relationship and the trust between you.”

In emergencies, that trust has made all the difference. Mulkern recounted one incident where the mother’s water broke and four loops of umbilical cord came out prematurely. “I called the surgeon but we needed to act immediately. I made eye contact with the mom and told her to push, and she trusted me. The baby was born safely.”

Much has changed with midwifery since she first started her practice. “There’s a lot around ‘skin to skin’ contact between moms and babies right after the birth. The culture has changed based on research – it results in better transition, better breathing and better bonding.”

Other changes to the practice include delayed cord clamping, which lets baby get extra stem cells and oxygen; and encouraging the breast crawl, where the baby is given the opportunity to find their mothers’ breast on their own and to decide when to take the first breastfeed, resulting in better breastfeeding initiation.

Breastfeeding support has become de facto for new moms and babies too. “Many midwifery concepts have become the norm now, they’ve gone mainstream compared to when I started. Midwives can change the culture of a hospital. Doctors have adapted a lot for those that are low-risk. Doctors here have embraced it. So we only offer interventions for those that need it or want them.”

Unwelcome changes have come as well, with mothers and babies being impacted by the opioid epidemic. “When I started delivering babies, (opioid abuse) was rare. It was hardly anyone. Now it’s about 10% of our population. With programs like our New Life prenatal substance abuse treatment program, women can turn their lives around,” Mulkern stated.

With the 1,000 baby milestone behind her, she plans on continuing to add to the population of Mount Washington Valley one person at a time. “The practice of midwifery fulfills my desire to connect with the women I see and to make a difference in the world, one woman and one birth at a time.  It is my goal to empower women to become healthier, mentally and physically, to better care for themselves, their families, and their communities.”

For more information about midwifery services at Memorial Hospital or to make an appointment with Kathleen Mulkern, call 603-356-9355. You can also learn more online at http://www.memorialhospitalnh.org

Ribbon Cutting Celebrates Business Name Change

The T. Murray Wellness Center, Inc. was founded by Dr. Trish Murray over 12 years ago and has been the place to go in Mt. Washington Valley to alleviate pain. Over the past 6 years, Dr. Murray has trained and become certified in another specialty, functional medicine which is root cause medicine, focusing on finding the underlying cause of chronic diseases or conditions. “This is a multi-systems approach to medicine”, said Dr. Murray. “We look at all systems to find the reason for the condition and help people learn what changes they can make to help improve their health.”

Pictured from left: Elaine Swett, Loretta Hawes, Pamela Beaupre, Jude Trotter, APRN, Patricia Murray, D.O, Rita Corbitt, Cherie Jewell.

Now known as Discover Health Functional Medicine Center the practice and clinic has grown to include a new provider and expanded clinic and services.

On Friday, June 22 they celebrated with a ribbon cutting and open house at their clinic at 24 Pleasant Street, Conway. Guests toured the facility, received information on services and learned how Discover Health Functional Medicine Center can help restore and optimize your health. For more information visit them online or call the office at 603-447-3112.

Spring fitness in Mt. Washington Valley

Need a good place to exercise now that ski season is winding down? Do you need great fitness classes? Then stop in and visit the staff at Cranmore Fitness. They offer an expansive gym with every machine you could want, and a wide variety of classes. If you want to get in shape, this is a great place to start!

Gibson Center Seniors Learn About and Experience A Recreation Path

On  Friday, October 27 the  MWV Trails Association Rec Path Committee and Community Outreach Committee hosted the Gibson Center for Senior Services on a tour of the Mountain Division Trail in Fryeburg.

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Sally McMurdo, Marianne Borowski, Doug and Candy Armstrong, Tim Scott, and Jill Reynolds, program director for the Gibson Center
discussed what rec paths are, who uses them, and why, with a special presentation and discussion of the current North Conway Rec path project and capital campaign progress.

Along the way on North South Road, Rec Path Committee members pointed out where the North Conway Path will go. At the Visitor’s Center in Fryeburg, 4 seniors and volunteers walked the trail for about 40 minutes, talking about the benefits of such a rec path and the challenges of building one.

For more information visit MWV Trails Association.

Check out what is happening this FALL at White Mountain Aquatic Center

Aqua MASH Ever wanted to try out one of our adult classes but not sure if it is the right one for you? Join us Saturday October 21st from 11-1pm for our Aqua MASH. We will “mash” together all of our adult classes in 10 minute segments. Try any or all for FREE! There is no cost to get in, no cost to participate, and no pressure to join. Come enjoy a fall treat and see what we have to offer!

Adult Classes Come have fun with us!

~Masters Swim – Tues & Thurs 5:30 – 6:30am

~Aqua Dance – Tues & Thurs 9:00 – 10:00am

~ Adult Movement – Fri 9:00 – 10:00am

Coming in November                                             

~Aqua Aerobics – Mon 9:00 – 10:00am

~Aqua Chi – Wed 9:00 – 10:00am

~Aqua Yoga – watch for days & times

Learn to Swim Classes – The Early Winter Session registrations are now open. This session will go from October 30th – December 15th.

Sign up online at White Mountain Aquatic Center

Memorial Hospital Marks August as National Breastfeeding Awareness Month

August is National Breastfeeding Awareness Month and Memorial Hospital’s Family Birthing Center wants the public to know what it’s doing to support moms and babies in making breastfeeding as easy and accessible as possible.

Michelle Meader, RNC CLC took on the role as the lead facilitator of the weekly Breastfeeding Support Group last year.  Meader, a Registered Nurse and Certified Lactation Counselor, has been with the Family Birthing Center since 2014.

Ten years ago, the popular group was started by Heather Wasuta, a lactation counselor who worked in the Family Birthing Center. Since then, the group has evolved into an ongoing support network that includes seasonal get-togethers and many lifelong friendships.

Last year, Wasuta moved from the area and Meader has taken over what she says is “an especially rewarding” role. “I love my job and what I do,” Meader said when she took on the role.

“I think it’s really important to empower new moms so they feel confident that they can be successful at breastfeeding. We want them to know about their choices as well as the benefits of breastfeeding,” she said.

Before coming to Memorial, Meader was director of childbirth and lactation education at Littleton Hospital from 2011 to 2014. In her current role, she’s working with all of Memorial’s OB RNs who are Certified Lactation Counselors to continue the success of the program.

“Memorial is fortunate to have many nurses on staff with extensive breastfeeding training and certifications,” shared Memorial’s Family Birthing Center’s Leigh Copsey, RN, BSN, RNC-OB, CLC

National Breastfeeding Awareness Month is an opportunity to highlight the latest research about breastfeeding. Family Birthing Center manager Kris Dascoulias, RN, said the department is extremely proud of their 98% breastfeeding initiation rate.

“Breastfeeding is the first choice of nutrition for a baby. We start by introducing the subject during prenatal classes. There’s a special class dedicated to this one topic,” Dascoulias said. “Then, within 24 hours of mom’s hospital admission, we’ve developed an individual lactation care plan with her.”

Although general recommendations are for six months to a year of breastfeeding, Dascoulias says any amount of time offers significant benefits for the newborn. “There are important immune protective factors for the baby as well as increased bonding with mom.”

The support group is “a wonderful free community service,” Dascoulias said. “Even if you choose not to breastfeed, it’s open to all new moms.”

The Breastfeeding Support Group, which meets every Wednesday at 10 am at the Main Street Professional Building, two buildings south of the hospital. Babies and siblings are welcome, and the OB staff is always available by phone to answer questions.

For more information about birthing services at Memorial Hospital, call 356-4949 Ext. 2146 or visit the hospital’s website, MemorialHospitalNH.org or click here >

YOGA, REIKI AND HEALING ARTS

Downward Facing Dog Days of Summer may be coming to an end, but the flow of energy is still going strong.  Join Bliss Wellness and Healing Arts this August to keep your energy levels high!

Much is happening in the world, come and be lifted in Sacred Space in this heartfelt space where so many seek rest and relaxation from the outside world.

Each August Anjali Rose vacations with her tribe of yogis, dancers and meditation gurus at the wonderful Dance New England Summer Camp. She’ll be sharing her teachings, sound healing and Reiki with this community August 18 – August 27.

For information on August events >

Bliss Wellness and Healing Arts Center
Conveniently located at 45 Washington Street, 2nd Floor Conway
Parking in Rear
Events are also listed on Facebook for more information

Memorial Hospital to Offer Therapeutic Fitness Workshops

Press Release

Media Contact: Kathy Bennett, Vice President – Community Relations & Development
603-356-5461 ext. 2198
kbennett@memorialhospitalnh.org

NORTH CONWAY, NH –   Memorial Hospital announced the launch of a new series of therapeutic fitness workshops designed by their sports medicine and physical therapy specialists. These classes are suitable for all ages and fitness levels and will be instructed by fitness professionals with advanced knowledge of anatomy and injury prevention. The goal? To provide an option for individuals who need more exercise specialization than a traditional gym but not necessarily the services of a physical therapist.

memorial hospital therapeutic workshops
Memorial is offering new therapeutic exercise classes designed by Matt Geary, DPT (center). He is shown here with fellow physical therapists Angela Serrani, DPT (left) and Stephanie Pavao, PT (right).

 

The classes will focus each month on a different body part with exercises that have been selectively filtered for effectiveness. Matt Geary, DPT, physical therapist at Memorial stated, “These classes are designed to be broader and more robust. This is different than what you can typically find as we have partnered with our sports medicine physician, physical therapists and community-based fitness professionals.”  Geary consulted with Memorial’s Dr. James Glazer in developing the class. Glazer is board certified in sports medicine and is the on-hill physician for the US Men’s Ski Team.The classes are appropriate for all ages and fitness levels. They’ll be offered 3 consecutive Tuesdays from 6-7pm with a different topic covered for each series each month.

The cost is only $30 for 3 classes and take place on the 2nd floor of Memorial’s physical therapy building, just north of the main hospital building on Route 16.

The lineup of classes are as follows:

  • Upper Extremity – This workshop is specifically designed to focus on proper shoulder mechanics and reducing rotator cuff injuries, as well as, upper body posture and decreasing risk for elbow overuse injuries like tennis and golfer’s elbow.  The first series being offered, the Upper Extremity series begins June 20, 2017. The class will be taught by Kate Soule, personal trainer and licensed massage therapist and reiki practitioner.
  • Lower Extremity – Designed to focus on proper knee and hip mechanics and will include corrective exercises to address hip and knee dysfunction. Ideal for runners and bikers, this workshop will also address lower body flexibility and target key areas like IT band and calf.
  • Back and Core – Did you know that sit ups might be bad for you? This workshop will focus on proper posture and will include safe exercises to build a strong and healthy core.

    Register online at https://memorialpophealth.coursestorm.com/browse or call 603-356-5461 x2187.

 

About Memorial Hospital

Memorial Hospital is Mt. Washington Valley’s most complete healthcare facility, with a  25-bed Critical Access Hospital . It is a member of the MaineHealth family. Its services include a 24-hour emergency department, surgery center, clinical laboratory, physical therapy practice, heart health & wellness programs, family birthing center, sleep center, wound care center, oncology, chemotherapy and infusion services and the Miranda Center for Diabetes.

Physician practices include primary care and family medicine, women’s health, orthopedics and sports medicine. The Merriman House, a 45-bed nursing home specializing in Alzheimer’s and other memory disorders, is also located on the hospital campus. Together, our staff and providers are committed to meeting the health needs of the Mt. Washington Valley and surrounding communities by collaborating with community partners in the delivery of accessible, comprehensive, compassionate, and quality health care.