Category Archives: Valley People

Shirley and Richard Van Dyne are White Mountains Treasures

Shirley and Richard Van Dyne are described as mainstays of Memorial Hospital’s entrance for 10 years – and that’s just the beginning. The list of Shirley & Richard Van Dyne’s combined service is extensive, and includes (but is probably not limited to) helping with Tin Mountain Conservation Center, North Conway Community Center, MWV Mud Bowl, Volvo Tennis Tournament, RSVP of Carroll County, The Salvation Army, Boy Scouts of America, John Fuller School reading programs, Madison Elementary School, the Albany Historical Society, Girl Scouts of America, Meals on Wheels, blood drives with the American Red Cross, the Albany Civic Group, and Memorial Hospital.

Shirley and Richard Van Dyne, center, receive the White Mountains Treasure Award from Lee Myles, Interim CEO, Memorial Hospital and Kathy Bennett, VP Community Relations.

The Van Dyne’s have logged in over 2500 hours of service to Memorial Hospital alone over these last ten years, and their service to the community through the aforementioned organizations spans more than 50 years.

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Floyd Corson is a White Mountains Treasure

Floyd Corson can be found every Sunday playing the organ at the First Church of Christ. He began his volunteering experience by stepping in to cover the organ for a single Christmas season, and instead remained the volunteer organist for the last 19 years. As an accomplished organist and pianist, Floyd has brought outstanding musical performances for anyone present at church on Sundays.

In addition to his Sunday services, Floyd was the pioneer of the White Mountain Musical Arts and the Bach Festival, which celebrated its 30th year this past summer. Floyd is highly regarded amongst his peers and the main reason the Mt. Washington Valley has been fortunate enough to host so many talented musicians of his field for such little money is a result of their respect for him.

Floyd Corson, center, receives the White Mountains Treasure Award from Lee Myles, Interim CEO, Memorial Hospital and Kathy Bennett, VP Community Relations.

He’s also an accomplished hiker, who’s summited all of New Hampshire’s 4000 footers, and this passion has moved him to volunteer at the Mount Washington Observatory.

For more information on the Chamber’s Annual Meeting!

2018 Employer of the Year – Badger Realty

The Employer of the Year Award is given each year to a business that demonstrates respect for employees and other business partners and excellence in creating a safe and inviting workplace. The Employer of the Year is also a business offering solid pay/benefits and the opportunity for training and advancement.

This year the Employer of the Year Award goes to Badger Realty. Since 1965, Badger Realty has been a staple of the Mount Washington Valley and a leader of community projects, volunteerism, and advancement. Dick Badger & Brenda Leavitt have created a family-oriented culture within an industry that had not historically been recognized through teamwork. They believe in the power of continuing education and encourage their employees to continue their professional development through education and training whenever possible.

Dick Badger is pictured with Janice Crawford, Executive Director, MWV Chamber of Commerce

Since 1995, Badger Realty has hosted an annual holiday party that included travel, lodging and meals for their employees and significant others. These annual trips have rewarded and brought happy employees (and spouses) to such destinations as Bermuda (5 times), Aruba, Captiva, the Bahamas, Walt Disney World, and Quebec.

A sign of a healthy company is their dedication to the community, which is why local non-profit organizations are crowded with Badger Realty’s agents and support staff. Some of the organizations served by Badger employees include Jen’s Friends, End 68 Hours of Hunger, Habitat for Humanity, Starting Point, Arts Jubilee, the Miranda Leavitt Diabetes Fund and the Mt. Washington Valley Trails Association.

Since longevity is an indication of a positive workplace, it’s notable that 18 employees with 10 or more years of service at Badger Realty, and eleven of those have more than 20 years.

2018 Entrepreneur of the Year – Coldwell Banker Wright Realty

Entrepreneur of the Year is awarded each year to a business in existence for seven or more years which fills a need within the community and demonstrates creativity, innovation and community involvement. Additionally, the business must be people-and-principle oriented as well as profitable.

This year the Entrepreneur of the Year Award goes to the team at Coldwell Banker Wright Realty. Owners Antonella Bliss, Lindsey Maihos and Rose Robinson took over leadership at Coldwell Banker Wright Realty during the same year as the economic crisis, and though the company has experienced ups and downs, 11 years later it has more than doubled its sales volume. In addition, they now have 19 agents and 4 support staff with future plans to expand their office space in Conway.

Lindsey Maihos, Antonella Bliss, and Rose Robinson, Owners, Coldwell Banker Wright Realty.The company has been recognized as the Premier Bronze Office by Coldwell Banker.

Their commitment toward the industry pushed them to host a real estate course in Conway. In the past young professionals interested in a real estate career had to travel outside the area to take the course and obtain a real estate license. Now, they can do that right here in the Valley. This program was instrumental in helping THRIVE recipient Theo Charles successfully become a licensed REALTOR®.

As a business team, they give back to the community through time and donations, encouraging others within the company to also give back to the community.

Business Owners Policy Business Insurance

Part of the series provided by Chalmers Insurance Group
The Importance of Insurance and How it Can Protect Your Finances

Business owners have a lot to consider when choosing insurance that fully protects their business. One coverage option, a business owners policy (BOP), can take the guesswork out of the process. A BOP bundles several types of coverage in one package, similar to the way a homeowners policy works, but is designed for small and midsized businesses.

BOP Key Features

A BOP generally combines the following types of coverage in one convenient bundle:

  • Commercial property insurance—Covers losses to property from common perils. It also covers office equipment, furniture, inventory, machinery, raw materials, computers and anything else that is vital to business operations.
  • General liability insurance—Covers a company’s legal responsibility for any harm it may cause to others, up to the policy limit. It also covers attorney fees and medical bills for anyone injured by the company.
  • Business interruption insurance—Reimburses for loss of income if a covered disaster interferes with the successful operation of the business.

Exclusions

Although a BOP is a convenient insurance option for small to midsized business owners, it does not cover professional liability, auto insurance, or workers’ compensation. Life, health and disability coverage is also excluded. For those exclusions, business owners can purchase separate insurance policies. Other examples include the following:

  • Crime coverage—Although it is minimal, crime coverage can be added to a BOP to cover losses as a result of crime, such as employee dishonesty and computer fraud. Typical crime coverage ranges between $1,000 and $5,000.
  • Data breach coverage—This coverage is commonly added to BOPs to help remedy the following losses resulting from data breaches:
    • Notifying impacted individuals
    • Hiring crisis communication consultants
    • Defense and settlement costs from associated lawsuits
    • Replacement of lost income
    • Extortion and ransom payments

Errors and omissions (E&O) coverage—Businesses that provide services for a fee can be sued by customers who claim that they were harmed because the business failed to perform its job properly. E&O coverage pays for any judgment for which the insured is found legally liable, up to the policy limit. It also covers legal defense costs.

Ideal Candidates for a BOP

Businesses that have the following characteristics are ideal candidates for a BOP:  

  • Operate in a physical location, whether home-based or outside the home
  • Have assets that can be stolen, including products, cash, furniture and digital property
  • Are at a high risk for lawsuits
  • Employ less than 100 employees and have less $5 million in sales

The following types of businesses frequently purchase BOPs to protect from losses not covered by general liability insurance:

  • Manufacturers
  • Religious organizations
  • Apartments
  • Restaurants
  • Technology consultants and solutions providers
  • Wholesalers
  • Retailers

Eligibility

Small to midsized businesses need to meet specific criteria to be eligible for a BOP. When determining eligibility, insurers consider factors that include the type of business, size of its primary location, class of business and revenue.

Premiums for BOP policies are based on eligibility factors, as well as financial stability, building construction, security features and fire hazards.

When purchasing business insurance, it is important to obtain the right amount. Contact Chalmers Insurance Group for guidance as to whether a BOP is a logical choice for your business 800-360-3000.

Ribbon Cutting for Groups

Groups, a mission-driven medical practice that offers affordable treatment for opioid use disorder in rural communities, celebrated the opening of their ninth New Hampshire location with a ribbon cutting September 4.

Pictured from left; Heather Prebish, Clinical Director, Jennifer Leiser, Office Coordinator, Melissa Fernald, Counselor, Lori Boisvert, Office Coordinator and Trainer, and Evan Stuart, Regional Manager

“We provide effective and affordable treatment to recover from opiate use” said Heather Prebish, Clinical Director. “At Groups, you can get the therapy and medication you need to regain control of your life. Unlike programs where you meet alone with a physician, we bring everyone together. People at different stages of recovery learn from each other, build collective wisdom, and hold each other accountable. Our counselors help you make a deep personal transformation and find purpose in life”.

Groups is located at 1620 East Main Street, Center Conway. For information please call 1-800-683-8313 or visit joingroups.com.

Infinger Insurance Celebrates Move to New Office in North Conway

Infinger Insurance, a family owned, independent insurance agency, celebrated their move to Pepsy Corner, 1205 Eastman Road, North Conway with a ribbon cutting on Thursday, August 30. The former Sound Resort building was renovated and remodeled to offer an expanded office totaling 4,000 square feet featuring a lobby area, office spaces for staff, conference rooms and a full kitchen.


President Wayne Infinger is joined by his three sons, Nate, Dave and Michael and 10 employees, in addition to 5 who work in the Norway, ME office.

For more information, go to infingerinsurance.com or call 603-447-5123. Hours are 8 am – 4:30 pm, Monday-Friday. The Norway office can be reached at 207-743-6554.

Pictured from left Kathy Ela, Diane Woodward, Michael Infinger, Nathan Infinger, Wayne Infinger, David Infinger, Kristal Merrill, Keri Cathcart, Tonya Fox, Kimberly Wood, Megan Ramsay, Margaret MacDonald, and Kevin Drew.

Certified Nurse Midwife Kathleen Mulkern Reaches 1,000 Birth Milestone at Memorial Hospital

The Town of Jackson recorded 816 residents in the 2010 census, but Certified Nurse Midwife Kathleen Mulkern can beat that and then some … she recently surpassed her 1,000th baby delivery at Memorial Hospital. Mulkern has delivered virtually an entire village over her 15 years of service!

Photo Caption: Kathleen Mulkern, ARPN, CNM – Certified Nurse Midwife, shown here with one of the 1,000 babies she has delivered at Memorial Hospital. Mom Tiara Hale is not pictured.
Photo by Megan Bailey

Mulkern has been caring for women and their babies for almost 30 years.  She shared, “I was born and raised in the Mount Washington Valley, and was fortunate to be given the opportunity in 2003 of returning with my family to live, raise my children and work as a nurse-midwife.”

She originally wanted to be a nurse practitioner, but changed her mind when a nurse midwife gave a presentation in college. “And that was it.”

When asked what keeps her going, Mulkern states that it’s the appreciation of people, and how you touch their lives. “There are certain births you always remember. It’s the relationship and the trust between you.”

In emergencies, that trust has made all the difference. Mulkern recounted one incident where the mother’s water broke and four loops of umbilical cord came out prematurely. “I called the surgeon but we needed to act immediately. I made eye contact with the mom and told her to push, and she trusted me. The baby was born safely.”

Much has changed with midwifery since she first started her practice. “There’s a lot around ‘skin to skin’ contact between moms and babies right after the birth. The culture has changed based on research – it results in better transition, better breathing and better bonding.”

Other changes to the practice include delayed cord clamping, which lets baby get extra stem cells and oxygen; and encouraging the breast crawl, where the baby is given the opportunity to find their mothers’ breast on their own and to decide when to take the first breastfeed, resulting in better breastfeeding initiation.

Breastfeeding support has become de facto for new moms and babies too. “Many midwifery concepts have become the norm now, they’ve gone mainstream compared to when I started. Midwives can change the culture of a hospital. Doctors have adapted a lot for those that are low-risk. Doctors here have embraced it. So we only offer interventions for those that need it or want them.”

Unwelcome changes have come as well, with mothers and babies being impacted by the opioid epidemic. “When I started delivering babies, (opioid abuse) was rare. It was hardly anyone. Now it’s about 10% of our population. With programs like our New Life prenatal substance abuse treatment program, women can turn their lives around,” Mulkern stated.

With the 1,000 baby milestone behind her, she plans on continuing to add to the population of Mount Washington Valley one person at a time. “The practice of midwifery fulfills my desire to connect with the women I see and to make a difference in the world, one woman and one birth at a time.  It is my goal to empower women to become healthier, mentally and physically, to better care for themselves, their families, and their communities.”

For more information about midwifery services at Memorial Hospital or to make an appointment with Kathleen Mulkern, call 603-356-9355. You can also learn more online at http://www.memorialhospitalnh.org

Ragged Mountain Equipment Launches Factory Tours

If you thought American manufacturing had all gone to Mexico or China, then a pleasant surprise awaits you right here in the Mt Washington Valley. Ragged Mountain Equipment on Route 16 in Intervale has been quietly producing specialized outdoor clothing and gear since Ronald Reagan was in the White House. Starting this month, they are offering factory tours almost daily so you can see the entire fascinating process from start to finish. If you’ve been a regular at local farmers’ markets because you want to know where your food comes from, doesn’t it make sense to apply that same standard to the clothing you wear, and the gear you use?

You’ve driven by the Ragged Mountain Equipment factory countless times and probably stopped to grab a few items from their shop. But you may never have realized that skilled local designers and stitchers are hard at work right out back, producing those jackets, vests, gaiters and dog packs you see everywhere around you. And this isn’t one of those high-tech start-ups where robots follow a computer program to produce some mysterious widget; this is actual people handling actual fabrics and hardware, producing items you actually use. And, they’ve been doing it non-stop since 1985.

The Ragged Mountain Equipment factory tours run every Monday through Thursday, beginning at 10:00am. The guided tours only take about twenty to thirty minutes, and you’ll be able to witness the entire manufacturing process. Tours begin with fabric cutting, then progress through the kitting process and right on to the actual stitching. You’ll see products being  inspected and prepared for stocking in the retail department or boxed up to ship to other vendors or special order customers. Those customers include local non-profits, international retailers, and the US military. And finally, you’ll visit the design room and pattern library to see new products in the midst of the design process, with prototypes being tested and features being refined.

You’ll recognize a lot of the Ragged Mountain products–from Powerstretch Tights to TuckerMitts to Tuff Duffels–and wonder why you always assumed they were made somewhere abroad. There are ample opportunities to ask questions and chat with the craftspeople as they go about their work, and you’ll leave the tour with discount coupons for the products, some free samples, and the knowledge that American manufacturing is alive and well in Mt Washington Valley.

For more information on these new factory tours, call Ragged Mountain Equipment at 603-356-3042, visit their website at www.raggedmountain.com, or swing by their business at 279 NH-16 in Intervale.

Settlers Green Celebrates Opening of Regatta Great Outdoors

Family-owned outdoor and leisure clothing company, Regatta Great Outdoors, celebrated their opening at Settlers Green Streetside with a Ribbon Cutting on July 11. The store is located next to the newly opened Michael Kors, across from Columbia Sportwear at Suite M20. Regatta Great Outdoors is a UK-based outdoor clothing company that was founded in 1981 by the Black family. Father, Lionel Black, is the Chairman, son Keith is the Managing Director and daughter Joanne is the Buying Director. The company has acquired other popular UK brands over the years including Craghoppers and Hawkshead.

Picured in photo from left; Ido Masursky, Rob Barsamian, Tym Meserve, Machella Weegar, Keith Black, Mykel Palazzini and Laura Lemieux.

Products include men’s, women’s and children’s outdoor clothing including leisurewear, outerwear and footwear. Additionally, it has outdoor and camping accessories including sleeping bags, backcountry gear and backpacks.

 

“Regatta is the perfect fit for our customers flocking to North Conway for adventures in the White Mountains,” said Laura Lemieux, assistant director of marketing at Settlers Green. “This is the company’s first U.S. outlet store and we’re happy they’ve chosen us and this great recreational area.”

Settlers Green is open Monday to Saturday, 9:00am-9:00pm and Sunday 10:00am-6:00pm. For more information visit settlersgreen.com/

 

The Local Grocer Introduces Table + Tonic

The Local Grocer has taken their exceptional sourcing standards to dinner with the opening of their evening restaurant, Table + Tonic: Farm Bistro + Spirits. Owners and staff celebrated with a ribbon cutting on Wednesday, June 27 at their expanded location at 3358 White Mountain Highway, North Conway.


Pictured from left: Alexandria Small, Rich Schmidt, Executive Chef, Heather Chase and, Russ Van Deursen, Owners, Micah Blizzard and Paul Begley, Food and Beverage Manager.

Executive Chef Rich Schmitt will be taking the organic and local ingredients The Local Grocer is known for and producing creative, conscious cuisine to please the most discriminating food lover.

Table + Tonic will be bringing the herb garden to the bar with their Farm to Bar cocktails. They’re concocting their own herb, fruit, and nut-infused shrubs, cordials, liqueurs, bitters, and homemade syrups, many with herbs and berries from their own farm, Mountain Flower Farm in Intervale, NH. Along with some traditional bar favorites, expect to enjoy fun creations like kombucha cocktails, sparkling cups, and a mocktail menu for those who prefer a sophisticated beverage without the alcohol.

Guests who joined the celebration enjoyed samplings of their Conscious Cuisine menu, cocktails with an Herbalist’s twist, organic wine, and beer. For information, hours of operation, menu and more visit tableandtonic.com or call 603-356-6068.

Ribbon Cutting Celebrates Business Name Change

The T. Murray Wellness Center, Inc. was founded by Dr. Trish Murray over 12 years ago and has been the place to go in Mt. Washington Valley to alleviate pain. Over the past 6 years, Dr. Murray has trained and become certified in another specialty, functional medicine which is root cause medicine, focusing on finding the underlying cause of chronic diseases or conditions. “This is a multi-systems approach to medicine”, said Dr. Murray. “We look at all systems to find the reason for the condition and help people learn what changes they can make to help improve their health.”

Pictured from left: Elaine Swett, Loretta Hawes, Pamela Beaupre, Jude Trotter, APRN, Patricia Murray, D.O, Rita Corbitt, Cherie Jewell.

Now known as Discover Health Functional Medicine Center the practice and clinic has grown to include a new provider and expanded clinic and services.

On Friday, June 22 they celebrated with a ribbon cutting and open house at their clinic at 24 Pleasant Street, Conway. Guests toured the facility, received information on services and learned how Discover Health Functional Medicine Center can help restore and optimize your health. For more information visit them online or call the office at 603-447-3112.