Tag Archives: world fellowship center

Ukulele Workshop and Festival at the World Fellowship Center

world fellowship center 2Join the World Fellowship Center daily from July 16th-23rd for their Ukulele Workshop and Festival, located at 368 Drake Hill Road in Albany. Each day of the workshop and festival is an opportunity to begin or strengthen ukulele skills, meet ukulele players of all levels, and enjoy ukulele music!
Daily Schedule:
  • 9 – 9:30 am: SOS for Ukulele Starters
    Get help borrowing ukuleles, tuning, holding, strumming, or making simple chord shapes and you’ll be ready for:
  • 9:45 – 10:45 am: Sing & Strum Circle with Tips and Embellishments.
    For all levels.
  • 11 – noon: Expanding Playing Horizons
    Add to your repertoire of intermediate moves and styles, or take in what may be next.
  • 4:30 – 5:30 pm: Music Jam
    For all, on the lawn. Includes Dan Lynn Watt, Molly Lynn Watt, and Shana Aisenberg, multi-instrumentalist and coauthor of The Complete Ukulele Method.

world fellowship centerFor more information on the workshops and festival, call 603-447-2280 or visit worldfellowship.org.

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Early Music Week at World Fellowship

The 2017 World Fellowship’s Early Music Week, from June 22nd to June 29th, 2017, will explore the fruitful and multifaceted perspective of nature in music and the performing arts with the help of their talented and energetic faculty, inspired by the breath-taking natural surroundings of Mount Chocorua and Whitton Pond, and sustained by the garden-fresh organic vegetables on everyone’s dinner plates.

early music week.jpegThe World Fellowship describes nature’s strong influence on music since the days of Pythagoras: Natural imagery informed the lyrics of many medieval songs and musicians expanded their music by imitating the sounds of birds and animals, whose physical gestures also inspired new dance movements. In the Renaissance, the dynamics of wind and water gained their musical counterparts, and it wasn’t long before madrigals were turning landscapes, with their mountains, valleys, plains, heat and cold, heights and depths, into song. The inner aspects of human nature, such as pulse, breathe, sleep, excitement, rage, melancholy, and sorrow, came to be represented as well, often in a pastoral setting, with the help of musical-rhetorical figures. In the resulting form, opera, instrumental music and dance (along with costumes and scenery) brought the natural and human worlds together.

Learn more about these inspirations and inspire your own musical and performing arts talents during Early Music Week. Group classes are available and are tailored to participant abilities from advanced beginners to advanced, including classes for viol, recorder, voice, mixed ensembles and historical dance. For more information, visit worldfellowship.org or call 603-447-2280.

Kennett High Hosts Forum on Local McCarthy Era Story

Albany, NH –  On April 3, at Kennett High School in North Conway, the World Fellowship Center (WFC) will present a panel discussion entitled “More Than Just Ourselves: Willard Uphaus, Louis Wyman, and Civil Liberties in the McCarthy Era.”

Michael Ferber, University of New Hampshire Professor of English and Humanities, will lead a panel of distinguished scholars in a conversation about the Uphaus v. Wyman case, a Supreme Court decision that rocked NH and the country during the McCarthy era.  The case pitted the then New Hampshire attorney general, Louis Wyman against Willard Uphaus, a Methodist lay minister and then WFC executive director, in a showdown between the assertions of threats to national security and claimed rights to free speech and association, issues at the forefront of public discussion today.

In 1953, Wyman, as part of his investigation to root out “un-American activities” under the NH Subversive Activities Act of 1951, served a subpoena on Uphaus seeking disclosure of WFC’s guests, staff and program presenters. The Albany summer camp attracted his attention for its free-wheeling discussions of political, economic, and social issues.  Uphaus refused to comply with the subpoena, relying on the First Amendment.  The fight captured the headlines and ultimately went to the US Supreme Court, which, in a 5-4 decision, sided with Wyman that the guest list must be provided.  Uphaus continued to defy the subpoena and spent a year in Merrimack County jail in Boscawen for contempt of court.

“The issues considered in this forum could not be more timely,” said World Fellowship codirector Andy Davis. “We once again find ourselves in a society-wide discussion about the appropriate balance between individual freedoms and the needs of the wider community. In the age of Wikileaks and more powerful and technically proficient intelligence gathering, where do we find the balance between communal security and the right of conscience of each citizen? We look forward to a broad discussion of these issues.”

Professor Ferber will be joined by panelists W. Jeffrey Bolster, professor of history at the University of New Hampshire, Clare Chapman, New Hampshire Council of Churches executive director, and Maria Sanders, associate professor of philosophy at Plymouth State University.

The North Conway event is at 7 p.m. on Monday April 3, in the Loynd Auditorium, at Kennett High School, 409 Eagles Way. The same forum is also being presented in Dover at 7pm, Tuesday, April 4, at the Dover City Hall Auditorium, 288 Central Ave. These programs are made possible by a generous grant from the New Hampshire Humanities Council (NHHC) and the hospitality of Kennett High School.

For further information, please contact: Andy Davis, at 603-447-2280, or visit www.worldfellowship.org/willarduphaus/.

Kennett High Hosts Forum on Local McCarthy Era Story

Albany, NH –  On April 3, at Kennett High School in North Conway, the World Fellowship Center (WFC) will present a panel discussion entitled “More Than Just Ourselves: Willard Uphaus, Louis Wyman, and Civil Liberties in the McCarthy Era.”

Michael Ferber, University of New Hampshire Professor of English and Humanities, will lead a panel of distinguished scholars in a conversation about the Uphaus v. Wyman case, a Supreme Court decision that rocked NH and the country during the McCarthy era.  The case pitted the then New Hampshire attorney general, Louis Wyman against Willard Uphaus, a Methodist lay minister and then WFC executive director, in a showdown between the assertions of threats to national security and claimed rights to free speech and association, issues at the forefront of public discussion today.

In 1953, Wyman, as part of his investigation to root out “un-American activities” under the NH Subversive Activities Act of 1951, served a subpoena on Uphaus seeking disclosure of WFC’s guests, staff and program presenters. The Albany summer camp attracted his attention for its free-wheeling discussions of political, economic, and social issues.  Uphaus refused to comply with the subpoena, relying on the First Amendment.  The fight captured the headlines and ultimately went to the US Supreme Court, which, in a 5-4 decision, sided with Wyman that the guest list must be provided.  Uphaus continued to defy the subpoena and spent a year in Merrimack County jail in Boscawen for contempt of court.

“The issues considered in this forum could not be more timely,” said World Fellowship codirector Andy Davis. “We once again find ourselves in a society-wide discussion about the appropriate balance between individual freedoms and the needs of the wider community. In the age of Wikileaks and more powerful and technically proficient intelligence gathering, where do we find the balance between communal security and the right of conscience of each citizen? We look forward to a broad discussion of these issues.”

Professor Ferber will be joined by panelists W. Jeffrey Bolster, professor of history at the University of New Hampshire, Clare Chapman, New Hampshire Council of Churches executive director, and Maria Sanders, associate professor of philosophy at Plymouth State University.

The North Conway event is at 7 p.m. on Monday April 3, in the Loynd Auditorium, at Kennett High School, 409 Eagles Way. The same forum is also being presented in Dover at 7pm, Tuesday, April 4, at the Dover City Hall Auditorium, 288 Central Ave. These programs are made possible by a generous grant from the New Hampshire Humanities Council (NHHC) and the hospitality of Kennett High School.

For further information, please contact: Andy Davis, at 603-447-2280, or visit www.worldfellowship.org/willarduphaus/.

Weekend Retreat at the World Fellowship Center

Would you like to give up the struggle and spend less time and energy trying to make good things happen in your life?
“Finding Your Essence” is a weekend retreat designed to help participants balance their lives and discover the life they are meant to live. Guided by professional life coach Cathy Nealon of Conway, NH, participants will be given tools to help them identify things about themselves that make them unique, and to explore habits, thoughts and attachments that could be holding them back.

The Finding Your Essence Retreat will be held September 14-16
at World Fellowship Center in Albany, NH.
This weekend is being co-facilitated by Melody Nester of North Conway and Keith Connors of North Andover who previously co-facilitated a “Listening for What’s Calling You” retreat experience at the Center.

The workshop fee is $25 plus lodging at World Fellowship Center which runs $99-129/night depending on type of accommodations, (less if you want to camp), and includes home-cooked meals prepared using foods grown on-site.  All workshop attendees will receive  a copy of “A Guide to Getting it: Achieving Abundance” co-authored by Cathy Nealon.

The weekend experience will also include time to explore nearby nature trails individually or as a group, storytelling entertainment by World Fellowship Center’s Andy Davis, and an opportunity to rowboat or swim in mile-long Whitton Pond located on the Center’s more than 455 acres.

For more information or to make a reservation, visit www.worldfellowship.org or call 603- 447-2280.