Pet Insurance Coverage Basics and Costs

Part of the series provided by Chalmers Insurance Group

Unfortunately, just like humans, pets can have medical problems that may yield expensive veterinary bills. Fortunately, pet insurance is available to combat those risks.

What is Pet Insurance?

Most pet owners consider their animals to be members of their family; therefore, their pet’s quality of life and health is extremely important. By purchasing pet insurance, pet owners are not burdened with veterinary bills and can focus on making sure their pets get and stay healthy.

Coverage Basics

Here are the details of a typical pet insurance policy:

  • Policies allow the pet owner to select a coverage percentage or monthly premium that will work best for them.
  • Pets must have an annual exam and owners must adhere to the recommendations of their veterinarians to remain covered.
  • Coverage is not extended to existing conditions and injuries.
  • Policy covers expenses relating to the following:
    • Some vaccinations
    • Lab work
    • Accidents, injuries and illnesses
    • Prescriptions
    • X-rays
    • Surgeries, including spay/neuter
    • Hospitalization
    • Dental work

Steep Costs

Medical costs for your pets can add up quickly. Here are some of the most common veterinary treatments and typical average costs:

  • Benign skin mass: $1000
  • Torn ACL or cartilage: $2600
  • Tooth extraction: $900

We’re Here to Help

Don’t take the chance of not being able to afford medical care for your furry family members. Call Chalmers Insurance Group today at 800-360-3000 to learn more about all of our insurance solutions.

For an immediate quote and our Strategic Partner Discount, please visit our trusted carrier partner FIGO using this link https://figopetinsurance.com/?p=9H8i8m7z1r5

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Memorial Hospital Supports Ski Helmet Safety for Local Children

Memorial Hospital once again has ensured that every child in its community that wants a ski helmet, gets one, regardless of their family’s ability to pay. It’s all part of a helmet safety initiative to ensure that local school children have appropriate helmets for their participation in elementary ski programs including the Eastern Slope Ski Club’s (ESSC) Junior Ski Program in the Conway School District and, new this year, the Fryeburg Junior Ski Program.

Memorial Hospital Foundation created the Roger C. Clapp Memorial Ski Helmet Fund to help put “a lid on every kid.” Clapp, who passed away in 2013, was a hospital trustee for many years and a passionate lifelong skier. Family and friends make memorial donations to the fund and continue to encourage contributions to it. Special thanks this year go to former hospital trustee Phil Davies, who served alongside Roger Clapp for many years and this year made a generous gift to ensure that the program continue again this year. Additional contributors to the program include many employees who give through a special employee giving program.

The National Ski Areas Association reports on their website that while skiing or boarding responsibly is the first priority for safety, helmets are an important second line of defense. The group reports that wearing helmets can decrease the risk of head injury by 10 to 50 percent. It can also mean the difference between a major head injury and a minor head injury, or between a minor head injury and no injury at all.

Conway Elementary School students Mattie Macomber, Cami Newton and Jillian Howland pose at Cranmore Mountain with Jessica Stewart, Athletic Trainer at Orthopedics at Memorial Hospital. The students are wearing helmets received through the Roger C. Clapp Ski Helmet Program.

“Memorial Hospital provides many healthcare services to help injured skiers and snowboarders, from fixing broken bones to physical therapy, athletic training and concussion care, but our preference is to help skiers and riders to prevent injuries in the first place,” said Jessica Stewart, Athletic Trainer at Orthopedics at Memorial Hospital. “We are lucky that we have the Roger C. Clapp Helmet program to help local children prevent head injuries.”

Many families face difficult financial situations at home which can make it hard for them to find the funds for equipment. As families may struggle to pay for basic necessities, things like skiing equipment may not be a part of their budget. That’s what makes this program so important for students who may not be able to afford it on their own.

This year, over 200 helmets were distributed to students in December, prior to the start of the youth ski program season. To qualify for a free helmet, students must be enrolled in the school’s free/reduced rate meals program while others have the opportunity to purchase helmets at a significant discount.

Anyone wishing to donate to the Roger Ski Clapp Helmet Fund may find more information at www.memorialhospitalnh.org/ways-to-give/make-a-donation or call 603-356-5461, x2269.

Insurance For Your Vacation Home

Part of the series provided by Chalmers Insurance Group

Owning a vacation home has many benefits that both you and your family can enjoy for a lifetime. However, many don’t realize that insuring vacation homes is complex and often very different than coverage for primary homes.

In fact, the way you utilize a property and how often it’s occupied has a direct impact on the kinds of insurance you will need. Vacation property insurance is typically provided as a “named perils” policy. This essentially means that coverage for vacation homes is not comprehensive, and owners must secure coverage for specific risks, like fires or explosions.

In order to properly protect their investment, vacation homeowners should consider the following types of coverage:

  • Contents coverage—Typically, standard home insurance policies protect any property that you transport back and forth between homes. Contents coverage fills in the gaps and protects any items that are permanently kept at your vacation home.
  • Replacement cost coverage—This type of insurance works in conjunction with contents coverage and reimburses the cost of repairing or replacing an item.
  • Coverage for detached private structures—Many vacation homes have private structures like boathouses and sheds you’ll need to account for.

Coverage for certain risks, like water damage, sewer backup or vandalism, may be difficult to secure or excluded altogether.

If you rent your home out to others as a Vacation Income Property, business insurance may be needed to protect against varying exposures. This goes for long and short term rentals, Airbnb, HomeAway, and other sharing services.

For example a homeowners policy is designed to protect against risks associated with a homeowner occupied dwelling whereas a landlord policy is protecting against the risks of others living in your property. Those are two very different uses of a property.

As such, it’s important to contact a qualified insurance agent to help assess your needs and build a custom policy for your vacation home. Chalmers offers homeowners, secondary, seasonal, and CVIP – Chalmers Vacation Income Property insurance.

A December to Remember

Snowvember came upon Mt. Washington Valley this year, with last month being one of the snowiest Novembers  in memory! The good news is that the snowpack is still in great shape, and low temperatures have given ski areas many ample opportunities for snowmaking. The skiing this month has made it a December to Remember with all local areas now open – from Black Mountain to Bretton Woods, from King Pine to Great Glen- to everything in between. This sets us up nicely for the upcoming Christmas Vacation Week!

Some Tips for Holiday Skiing

Business has been brisk at Valley ski areas, as news has spread about the amazing conditions and open terrain after several sizeable snowfalls fell through the White Mountains. This is reason to believe the holiday period will also be popular. A few tips to get the most out of your trip to the North Conway area:

  • Book your trip ahead of time and ask your hotel about discount lift tickets. Popular dates will sell out – especially New Year’s weekend. Cranmore Mountain Lodge and Colonial Motel are two nice values. Research lodging at http://www.mtwashingtonvalley.org
  • Beat the crowds – Christmas Day is usually a quiet day on the slopes, so some ski areas close all together, or offer discounted rates. Bretton Woods is open 10am – 4pm on the 25th with $45 lift tickets. That is less than half of the usual holiday rate, as their full day holiday lift tickets are $99 this year. Read about it at http://www.brettonwoods.com

    Wildcat Mountain
    My friend Marina makes her way with the wintery splendor of Mount Washington in the background. Shot 12/16/18.
  • Buy online in advance – Want to avoid paying full retail? Purchase your lift tickets online in advance. The further in advance and the more days you purchase, the better the savings. Attitash and Wildcat ski areas share a lift ticket, so your multi-day ticket purchased online lets you bounce between the areas from day to day. Buy online at www.attitash.com
  • Tune your skis before you go – With increased holiday skier traffic, the conditions can get skied off later in the day. Freshly edged skis will keep you carving up a storm until the last run. The Valley features many ski shops to do a tune, as do most mountains. Find out where to find your closest option for an edge and wax here.
  • Celebrate On the Slopes – Want to know another secret? New Year’s Day is historically a much less busy day than the rest of the holiday week. New Year’s Eve revelers sleep in or pack it up early to head home. Don’t be that person. Greet 2019 by breathing in the brilliantly freezing air from atop a ski lift and know that great things are ahead for the New Year.

So how are conditions you may ask? Season to date, starting in early November,  I have skied Wildcat, Cranmore, Great Glen, Jackson Ski Touring and Bretton Woods (ah, the benefits of living close to the mountains). Conditions have ranged from powder to packed powder, to today’s machine groomed/variable conditions at Wildcat. Cross Country fans will want to pay close attention to the grooming report and hit the most recently tracked trails as some refreezing has taken place. Overall, I would rate this December among the best for early season turns and tracks, truly one to remember!

Tunnel at Wildcat Mountain
Who doesn’t love tunnels? This one connects the cross over from the Bobcat Triple to the Wild Kitten beginner area at Wildcat. Shot 12/16/18.

 

 

Cyber Liability Insurance

Part of the series provided by Chalmers Insurance Group

As technology becomes increasingly important for successful business operations, the value of a strong cyber liability insurance policy will only continue to grow. The continued rise in the amount of information stored and transferred electronically has resulted in a remarkable increase in the potential exposures facing businesses. In an age where a stolen laptop or hacked account can instantly compromise the personal data of thousands of customers, or an ill-advised post on a social media site can be read by hundreds in a matter of minutes, protecting yourself from cyber liability is just as important as some of the more traditional exposures businesses account for in their general commercial liability policies.

Why Cyber Liability Insurance?

A traditional business liability policy is extremely unlikely to protect against most cyber exposures. Standard commercial policies are written to insure against injury or physical loss and will do little, if anything, to shield you from electronic damages and the associated costs they may incur. Exposures are vast, ranging from the content you put on your website to stored customer data. Awareness of the potential cyber liabilities your company faces is essential to managing risk through proper coverage.

Possible exposures covered by a typical cyber liability policy may include the following:

  • Data breaches: Increased government regulations have placed more responsibility on companies to protect clients’ personal information. In the event of a breach, notification of the affected parties is now required by law. This will add to costs that will also include security fixes, identity theft protection for the affected and protection from possible legal action. While companies operating online are at a heightened risk, even companies that don’t transmit personal data over the internet, but still store it in electronic form, could be susceptible to breaches through data lost to unauthorized employee access or hardware theft.
  • Intellectual property rights: Your company’s online presence, whether it be through a corporate website, blogs or social media, opens you up to some of the same exposures faced by publishers. This can include libel, copyright or trademark infringement and defamation, among other things.
  • Damages to a third-party system: If an email sent from your server has a virus that crashes the system of a customer, or the software your company distributes fails, resulting in a loss for a third party, you could be held liable for the damages.
  • System failure: A natural disaster, malicious activity or fire could all cause physical damages that could result in data or code loss. While the physical damages to your system hardware would be covered under your existing business liability policy, data or code loss due to the incident would not be.
  • Cyber extortion: Hackers can hijack websites, networks and stored data, denying access to you or your customers. They often demand money to restore your systems to working order. This can cause a temporary loss of revenue plus generate costs associated with paying the hacker’s demands or rebuilding if damage is done.
  • Business interruption: If your primary business operations require the use of computer systems, a disaster that cripples your ability to transmit data could cause you, or a third party that depends on your services, to lose potential revenue. From a server failure to a data breach, such an incident can affect your day-to-day operations. Time and resources that normally would have gone elsewhere will need to be directed towards the problem, which could result in further losses. This is especially important as denial of service attacks by hackers have been on the rise. Such attacks block access to certain websites by either rerouting traffic to a different site or overloading an organizations server.

Cyber liability insurance is specifically designed to address the risks that come with using modern technology; risks that other types of business liability coverage simply won’t. The level of coverage your business needs is based on your individual operations and can vary depending on your range of exposure. It is important to work with an agent who can identify your areas of risk so a policy can be tailored to fit your unique situation.

As reliance on technology continues to increase, new exposures continue to emerge. As your business grows, make sure your cyber liability coverage grows with it. Chalmers Insurance Group is here to help you analyze your needs and make the right coverage decisions to protect your operations from unnecessary risk 800-360-3000.

Great Day at Great Glen Trails

By Kathy Bennett

One of the best things about skiing in Mt. Washington Valley is the sheer number of options you have within a very reasonable driving distance. A snowy November continues here so there were several choices for alpine and Nordic skiing options this weekend. I was undecided on my direction when I left my house Saturday morning, so I tossed both downhill and cross country gear in the trunk and decided to wait for inspiration to guide my car.

The inspiration came at the intersection of Route 302 and 16 by Dairy Queen. A bright new billboard beckoned me to Great Glen, home to the new Glen House hotel. It had been about 2 years since I skied there last so it was time for a return visit.

Great Glen TrailsAmazing views great skiers from the base lodge

Driving past Wildcat, which has been open for weeks and looked to be in fine form, I felt a twinge of regret for not choosing downhill. But too much turkey and stuffing made the cardio blast of XC the right choice for me.

Great Glen Trails
Mt. Adams looms large

Any regret quickly dissipated as I arrived. The day was crystal clear and Mount Washington and Mount Adams gave a silent white welcome to those arriving to ski. I was in good company, as a large holiday craft fair was going on, and a competition of some sort brought many young folks to the Notch. All in all, it didn’t feel like November, either by snow conditions, head count or energy level.

I changed out my gear in the convenient and well appointed locker room – changing rooms, bath rooms and space to change made it comfortable to get ready for the day. I asked what was open and groomed and was delighted to hear the answer … “Everything.” How often can you expect this in November?

Inside the Great Angel Cabin

I headed out under the bridge and around the new Glen House. Its huge wall of windows point to the Presidential Range. I made a mental note to return to try out their restaurant, which is gaining a great reputation for both its views and its cuisine.  I skied several loops, across fields, uphill and down, until I came to the Great Angel Cabin. A picnic table outside and Adirondack chairs inside beckon to weary skiers. I stripped off my jacket and relaxed for a bit – the ski uphill definitely got my heart rate up!  After my break, I enjoyed the long turny downhill back towards the lodge, across fields, streams and another view of that lovely new hotel.

Thanksgiving Weekend was a skiers’ dream. What areas were not open are planning on doing so in the next few weeks. Given the natural snowfall, cold temperatures, and the arrival of another foot of snow Tuesday, they should have no problem doing so.

 

 

Thanksgiving Can Wait

By Kathy Bennett

The weekend before Thanksgiving is the time many spend to look up recipes, make shopping lists and gather the goods necessary for the turkey day to come. But snow came early this year to Mt. Washington Valley, so all the Thanksgiving duties got pushed aside as I spent both weekend days checking out the amazing early season skiing in and around North Conway, New Hampshire.

Bretton Woods opened for the season on Friday, Nov. 16 and conditions sweetened up overnight as light snowfall continued. The first thing visitors will notice is the new Gondola base being installed right in front of the base lodge. When complete, it will be the only 8 person gondola in the state.

The gondola base – coming soon with 8 person cabins.

With 7 trails open with 2 lifts operating, Bretton Woods had top to bottom runs ready for action. Skiing in mid-November usually consists of “the white ribbon of death” – a narrow swath of man-made snow down the center of the trail with no white stuff in the trees. Not so this year.  Snowy views greeted skiers as one looked off to Mount Washington and closer, Mount Deception. An all natural snow trail – Granny’s Grit – offered a foot of ungroomed freshies which challenged my first-day-of-the-season legs. Watch out for the water bars and point your tips downhill!

Fun, friends and snow at Bretton Woods on November 17.

I had prepared for the ski season by purchasing new boots at the annual Eastern Slope Ski Club ski swap the previous weekend, and followed up by having custom footbeds installed at the Ski Liquidators. What a difference. Do yourself a favor this ski season – invest in this personalized fitting and watch your skiing improve. I know I did.

Day two of the season saw me searching the basement for my skinny skis and cross country ski boots. With man-made snowmaking, pre-Thanksgiving alpine skiing is not unusual. But cross-country skiing? Now that’s a rare treat. Mt Washington Valley now has three cross-country skiing areas open – Great Glen, Bretton Woods and Jackson Ski Touring. Jackson’s Prospect Farm parking lot was completely full when I arrived at 10:30am on Sunday, so I was not alone in reveling in the early season splendor.  My legs burned, but I made it up to the Orchard Trail, then enjoyed the long downhill before banging a hard right onto Quail. Remind me to work on cardio strength before my next day out. I made it back to my car out of breath and excited to have traveled 3 miles under my own ski power.

Jackson Ski Touring’s Wildcat Valley Trail with tracked and skate grooming November 17

While I didn’t ski it personally, Cranmore reported their November 17th opening to be the earliest in their history. Hannes Schneider would be proud.

Thanksgiving week is predicted to be cold, a treat for snowmakers and skiers alike. Look for more areas to open with more terrain for the long holiday weekend.  

I’m glad I skipped the Thanksgiving prep this weekend – I just hope I remember to pick up the turkey on Wednesday.

All About Automobile Policy Coverage

Part of the series provided by Chalmers Insurance Group

An automobile insurance policy is designed to provide you with a level of protection against property, liability and medical costs if you are involved in a wreck:

  • Property coverage pays for damage to or theft of your car.
  • Liability coverage pays for your legal responsibility to others for bodily injury or property damage. Most other states require car owners to purchase a minimum of bodily injury and property damage liability insurance.
  • Medical coverage pays for the cost of treating injuries, rehabilitation and sometimes lost wages and funeral expenses.

Comprehensive and Collision Coverage

Collision: Covers damage to your car when your car hits, or is hit by, another vehicle or other object. This coverage is not required by a state, but if you have a loan or a lease, then the lien holder will require it.

Comprehensive: Covers your vehicle, and sometimes other vehicles you may be driving, for losses resulting from incidents other than collision. This coverage is not required, but a lender may insist that you carry it until your loan is paid off.

Types of Liability Coverage

Bodily injury liability (BI): This covers injuries that you, the designated driver or policyholder cause to someone else. It does NOT cover the cost of damage to your vehicle, or to you or other people on your policy. It is mandatory in most states.

Property damage liability (PD): Covers you or someone driving the car with your permission if the car damages someone else’s property. It also provides you with legal defense if another party files a lawsuit against you.

Medical payments (MP) or personal injury protection (PIP): This no-fault coverage provides medical expenses to you and your passengers injured in an accident.

Uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage (UM or UIM):  This coverage will reimburse you if of you are hit by an uninsured or hit-and-run driver or when an at-fault driver has insufficient insurance to pay for your total loss.

Top Ways to Save on Your Auto Premium:

  • Consider raising your deductible.
  • Keep up your good driving record.
  • Drive a car with safety features such as anti-lock brakes and airbags.
  • Install an anti-theft device.
  • Ask about our multi-policy discounts.

We’re Here to Help

Did you know that you need specific coverage when vehicles are used for business use? Or that ride-share and taxi services are usually excluded under personal insurance? Call Chalmers Insurance Group today at 800-360-3000 to learn more about all of our automobile insurance and risk management solutions.

Shirley and Richard Van Dyne are White Mountains Treasures

Shirley and Richard Van Dyne are described as mainstays of Memorial Hospital’s entrance for 10 years – and that’s just the beginning. The list of Shirley & Richard Van Dyne’s combined service is extensive, and includes (but is probably not limited to) helping with Tin Mountain Conservation Center, North Conway Community Center, MWV Mud Bowl, Volvo Tennis Tournament, RSVP of Carroll County, The Salvation Army, Boy Scouts of America, John Fuller School reading programs, Madison Elementary School, the Albany Historical Society, Girl Scouts of America, Meals on Wheels, blood drives with the American Red Cross, the Albany Civic Group, and Memorial Hospital.

Shirley and Richard Van Dyne, center, receive the White Mountains Treasure Award from Lee Myles, Interim CEO, Memorial Hospital and Kathy Bennett, VP Community Relations.

The Van Dyne’s have logged in over 2500 hours of service to Memorial Hospital alone over these last ten years, and their service to the community through the aforementioned organizations spans more than 50 years.

Floyd Corson is a White Mountains Treasure

Floyd Corson can be found every Sunday playing the organ at the First Church of Christ. He began his volunteering experience by stepping in to cover the organ for a single Christmas season, and instead remained the volunteer organist for the last 19 years. As an accomplished organist and pianist, Floyd has brought outstanding musical performances for anyone present at church on Sundays.

In addition to his Sunday services, Floyd was the pioneer of the White Mountain Musical Arts and the Bach Festival, which celebrated its 30th year this past summer. Floyd is highly regarded amongst his peers and the main reason the Mt. Washington Valley has been fortunate enough to host so many talented musicians of his field for such little money is a result of their respect for him.

Floyd Corson, center, receives the White Mountains Treasure Award from Lee Myles, Interim CEO, Memorial Hospital and Kathy Bennett, VP Community Relations.

He’s also an accomplished hiker, who’s summited all of New Hampshire’s 4000 footers, and this passion has moved him to volunteer at the Mount Washington Observatory.

For more information on the Chamber’s Annual Meeting!

Conway Area Humane Society opens Re-Tails Resale Shop

The Conway Area Humane Society (CAHS) recently held a ribbon cutting to celebrate the opening of their new ReTails Resale Shop located at the far end of the Conway Area Humane Society Shelter building in Conway. The shop is open Monday – Saturday with many items for sale including furniture, clothing, sporting goods, bedding, collectibles and more!

Volunteer opportunities are available. For more information email Katy at kbailey@conwayshelter.org or visit conwayshelter.org.

Pictured from left Valerie Horn, Board Director, Payton Cressey, Board Director, Katy Bailey, Volunteer Manager, Virginia Moore, Executive Director, Nate Marles, Board Chair, Cheryl Mitchell, Volunteer, and Suzie Laskin, Board Director.

For more information visit Conway Area Humane Society.

2018 Employer of the Year – Badger Realty

The Employer of the Year Award is given each year to a business that demonstrates respect for employees and other business partners and excellence in creating a safe and inviting workplace. The Employer of the Year is also a business offering solid pay/benefits and the opportunity for training and advancement.

This year the Employer of the Year Award goes to Badger Realty. Since 1965, Badger Realty has been a staple of the Mount Washington Valley and a leader of community projects, volunteerism, and advancement. Dick Badger & Brenda Leavitt have created a family-oriented culture within an industry that had not historically been recognized through teamwork. They believe in the power of continuing education and encourage their employees to continue their professional development through education and training whenever possible.

Dick Badger is pictured with Janice Crawford, Executive Director, MWV Chamber of Commerce

Since 1995, Badger Realty has hosted an annual holiday party that included travel, lodging and meals for their employees and significant others. These annual trips have rewarded and brought happy employees (and spouses) to such destinations as Bermuda (5 times), Aruba, Captiva, the Bahamas, Walt Disney World, and Quebec.

A sign of a healthy company is their dedication to the community, which is why local non-profit organizations are crowded with Badger Realty’s agents and support staff. Some of the organizations served by Badger employees include Jen’s Friends, End 68 Hours of Hunger, Habitat for Humanity, Starting Point, Arts Jubilee, the Miranda Leavitt Diabetes Fund and the Mt. Washington Valley Trails Association.

Since longevity is an indication of a positive workplace, it’s notable that 18 employees with 10 or more years of service at Badger Realty, and eleven of those have more than 20 years.

Anything is Possible!

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